Blog – Page 18 – UKMALAYALEE

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Here’s what your eyes reveal about your personality

GERMANY July 30: It has often been said that eyes are the window to the soul, revealing what we think and how we feel. A new research has revealed that the way your eyes move may also be an indicator of your personality type. Continue reading “Here’s what your eyes reveal about your personality”

Kerala police officers told to report their qualifications

THIRUVANANTHAPURAM July 30: A mirror with ‘Are you smart?’ written across the top is a typical feature of police stations in the state, for personnel to check their appearance. Continue reading “Kerala police officers told to report their qualifications”

Kerala NSS voices strong opposition to women entering Sabarimala

NEW DELHI July 30: The Nair Service Society (NSS) on Wednesday told the Supreme Court allowing women belonging to all age groups entry into the Sabarimala temple will change the character of the deity and the temple and the principal deity Lord Ayyappa himself doesn’t want it. Continue reading “Kerala NSS voices strong opposition to women entering Sabarimala”

How to Become a Digital Marketing Expert Through Blogging

Almost a decade ago, I started a blog. It was a blog about motorcycles. I started that blog because I was bored as the company that gave me a placement offer was delaying my joining date. The decision to start a blog was the best career decision I have ever made in my life, ever. It has helped me shape my digital marketing career and made me what I am today

After having worked in leading start-ups in India as a digital marketing manager, I am taking steps to start my own digital marketing agency. I am yet to complete the company registration but already have 150 clients lined up, ready to sign up for my services. If there is one thing that I would like to attribute most of my career success to — that would be blogging.

But people are skeptical and find it difficult to believe that you can actually become a digital marketing expert through blogging.Here I’ll explain how blogging can help you become a digital marketing expert.

It would also answer the following questions that people keep asking me:

How do I land a senior digital marketer position at an awesome company?
How do I learn marketing tactics that nobody else is using?
How do I create a personal brand that will have companies approaching me to hire my services?

Digital marketing has several aspects to it. The market has grown so big that each of these modules needs a separate expert inside a company.

Some of the major modules in digital marketing are as follows:

Content Marketing
Search Engine Optimization
Search Engine Marketing
Social Media Marketing
Social Media Advertising
Email Marketing
Marketing Automation
Analytics
Integrated Digital Marketing

To become a true digital marketer, you should be able to conduct high-quality digital marketing campaigns to help build brands from scratch. And, to do so, you need to know how to leverage all the skills mentioned above. And, if you want to become a specialist in one of those skills, you need to go deeper in it and master it.

In digital marketing, we call this a T-shaped marketer. The horizontal line of the ‘T’ is knowing all the basic components to be a good digital marketer and the vertical line of the ‘T’ is becoming a specialist in one of the component.

To master one of the mentioned skills, it will take a lifetime and it’ll be almost impossible to do so with the traditional method of learning. You can only become a master when you successfully apply the knowledge, not when you complete the learning. And, considering the fast-changing nature of the skills, you’ll need to constantly learn and apply.

Now, let’s look into each one of the skills and how blogging can help you to master it.

Content Marketing:

Content marketing is the hottest skill that’s in huge demand. Content marketing is not just writing a blog post or article and publishing it online.

According to Seth Godin, content marketing is the only marketing that remains. It has gained more traction as more and more businesses are starting to realize the importance of it. And it is mainly because the ads are becoming inefficient by each day.

Indian banks broke rules in Vijay Mallya case, says UK judge

LONDON March 17: The British judge hearing the extradition case of liquor baron Vijay Mallya today said that it was blindingly obvious that rules were being broken by Indian banks which sanctioned some of the loans to the erstwhile Kingfisher Airlines.

Presiding over a hearing at Westminster Magistrates’ Court in London, Judge Emma Arbuthnot described the case as a jigsaw puzzle with different pieces of massive evidence to be put together to paint a picture, which she said she was now able to see more clearly than a few months ago.

There are clear signs that the banks seem to have gone against their own guidelines [in sanctioning some of the loans], she said, inviting the Indian authorities to explain the case against some of the bank officials involved because that relates to the conspiracy point against Mallya.

The 62-year-old businessman, who is on trial for the UK court to rule if he can be extradited to India to face charges of fraud and money laundering amounting to around Rs. 9,000 crores, watched the proceedings from the dock.

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS), arguing on behalf of the Indian government, laid out their arguments against the defence calling into question the admissibility of some of evidence submitted by the Indian authorities.

Pointing out that Mallya had chosen not to give evidence in the case, CPS counsel Mark Summers rejected the defence claims on the evidence as nonsense.

The government of India has established by other copious evidence a prima facie case of fraud, he said.

The judge is expected to rule on the admissibility of evidence and set a timeframe for her final verdict. However, the matter could be delayed over further clarifications required on the source of some of the emails submitted as evidence by the Indian authorities.

Mallya’s counsel, Clare Montgomery, argued that evidence that was claimed as a blueprint of dishonesty by the CPS was in fact privileged conversation between Mallya and his lawyer about legal advice in clear contemplation of litigation and hence should be inadmissible.

On a separate category of evidence presented by the Indian government, Mallya’s team questioned the reliability of investigating officers in the case and pointed to over 150 pages of near identical material purporting to be statement of witnesses taken under Section 161 of the Indian CrPC.

“They do not appear to be in any way an account of things that witnesses would have said but rather seem to be somebody else’s analysis put into the mouths of the witnesses, down to the spelling mistakes,” Montgomery said, adding that the documents were “identically reproduced” with not only the same words but also the same typing errors.

The judge did not seem to be convinced by this argument and said she had found only two-three cases of mistakes but did not see a problem in the preparation of the statements.

Judge Arbuthnot had also sought further clarifications related to availability of natural light and medical assistance at Barrack 12 of Mumbai Central Prison on Arthur Road, where Mallya is to be held if he is extradited from Britain.

The CPS indicated to the judge that the government had provided all the necessary clarifications along with photographs of the two cells that comprise Barrack 12.

The extradition trial, which opened at the London court on December 4, is aimed at laying out a prima facie case of fraud against the tycoon, who has been based in the UK since he left India in March 2016. It also seeks to prove that there are no “bars to extradition” and that Mallya is assured a fair trial in India over his now-defunct Kingfisher Airlines’ alleged default of loans from a consortium of Indian banks.

The CPS, representing the Indian government, has argued that the evidence they have presented confirms dishonesty on the part of the businessman and that there are no bars to him being extradited from the UK to face Indian courts.

Mallya’s defence team has deposed a series of expert witnesses to claim he had no fraudulent intentions and that he is unlikely to get a fair trial in India.

Mallya was arrested by Scotland Yard on an extradition warrant in April 2017 and has been out on bail on a bond worth 650,000 pounds. Chief Magistrate Arbuthnot is expected to pronounce her verdict in the case by May this year.

If she rules in favour of the Indian government, the UK home secretary will have two months to sign Mallya’s extradition order. However, both sides will have the chance to appeal in higher courts in the UK against the chief magistrate’s verdict. – PTI

Fit a jockey: How the men, women in the saddle stay in shape

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You won’t have Trump kick around anymore with you?

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Migrants Told: Stay in France or go back to your country

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