How to de-ice your car in freezing conditions

Friday 1 February 2019 3:39 AM UTC

LONDON Feb 1: January and February are generally the coldest months of the year.

This coincides with the grim post-Christmas reality of British winter, in which waistbands and overdrafts are stretched to bursting, resolutions wither and die in chippies and station pubs, and we all (sadly) have to go back to work.

The last thing we need is a ten-minute chore in the morning.

But motorists are being reminded that in these icy months, it’s extremely important to properly clear the ice from your car before setting off. If you drive your car with ice covering your windscreen, you could be endangering yourself and others – as well as breaking the law.

Snow covered cars in the parking, close up. Antifreeze was not used. Vehicles in snow. Winter time is coming.

Bad weather conditions Snow covered cars in the parking, close up. Antifreeze was not used. Vehicles in snow. Winter time is coming. Bad weather conditions

The Highway Code clearly states that “windows and windscreens MUST be kept clean and free of obstructions to vision”.

During the winter months, this is particularly relevant – you must clear the ice (or snow) from all of your windows, as well as both the front and rear windscreen, before driving. This also applies to condensation that forms inside the car.

You should also pay attention to other parts of the car. The Highway Code states that “lights, indicators, reflectors and number plates MUST be kept clear”. Snow and ice could obscure your lights, so clear those too.

The only things you should ever use to de-ice your car is an ice scraper and/or some de-icer liquid.

If you have de-icer available, spray it onto the windows and windscreens of your car.

By starting at the top, you’ll allow gravity to help you out – the de-icing liquid will dribble down the windscreen, melting the ice as it goes. You’ll need to use a scraper as well, as de-icer rarely does the whole job.

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