30-May-2017
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S P Balasubrahmanyam to decide on notice after returning from US

Chennai: March 21: Playback singer S P Balasubrahmanyam is likely to decide on the legal notice issued to him by music composer Ilayaraja after returning from the US.
 
A source in the Tamil film industry said SPB, as Balasubrahmanyam is fondly known, will decide whether to take up the matter legally, adding that steps were initiated to solve the issue between the legends amicably.
 
Legal notices were issued to SPB and other playback singers, including his son Charan and K S Chitra, and the organisers of the concerts, asking them to stop singing Ilayaraja’s compositions without his consent.
 
If they continue to do so, it would amount to copyright infringement and would incur a huge penalty and legal action, the notice stated.
 
Ilayaraja’s counsel said his client has all the right to make a claim over his compositions and added the legal notice is confined to the show organised by SPB in the US.
 
The counsel claimed the issue of copyright law violation also arises when Ilayaraja’s compositions were used for a huge sum of money, especially in foreign countries.
 
SPB and other singers are currently on a world tour titled ‘SPB50’ to commemorate his 50 years in cinema. The concerts began in August in Canada, followed by Russia, Sri Lanka, Malaysia, Singapore, Dubai and the US.
 
“I request all friends, music lovers and especially all media persons, not to make I.Raja-SPB issue sensational. It is unfortunate. That is all. Show has to go on, life has to move on. In God’s creation all are good and equal (sic)”, SPB said on social media.
 
Reacting to the notice, the legendary singer said, “I am ignorant of these legalities. I am ignorant of the law. If it is a law, so be it and I will obey it.” 
 
Venkatesh, a leading advocate who deals with copyright cases in the Tamil film industry, said according to the law, a written permission should be obtained from the music director before using his/her composition for commercial purposes. 
 
“However, most of them do not follow the rules,” Venkatesh said.